REMOTE SENSING OF A SLAG DUMP IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

MAPS AND AERIAL
PHOTOGRAPHS



COLOR COMPOSITE
IMAGES



SPECTRAL
SIGNATURES



REFERENCES
It is widely known that Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is synonymous with steel production. The "Steel City" not only shaped the industry, but was shaped itself by the various processes and their legacies. One of the more pervasive remnants of steel making is the distribution of slag. Dig a hole almost anywhere in Pittsburgh and chances are one will find slag.

Amongst the many slag dumps in Pittsburgh, the Nine Mile Run pile on the city's east end (topographic map) stands as the last testament to thousands of mill jobs gone by. This 238 acre pile measures over 120 feet tall. From 1922 to 1972 Duquesne Slag dumped nearly 17 million cubic yards of slag from area mills on the site (SlagGarden website). Until 2001, the site stood as a barren wasteland. That changed when the City of Pittsburgh formed a joint venture to promote the development of the land. Currently, houses are being constructed and the land has been reclaimed.

ASTER images from 2000 are the basis of analysis for this project. The initial attempt of calibrating the spectra for slag against the Nine Mile Run test site and comparing its spectra to that of lithographic limestone published in the ASTER Spectral Library (ASTER website) must be postponed until software issues are resolved. Presented in this project are two color composite images and one reclass image that highlight the slag dump.


Prepared by Robert McHale for ES 771 at Emporia University in December 2003.