Pavé Stone Setting

by

Faye Stevenson Day


Image taken from www.alexandreschool.com/ENG/002-
atelier-02-opticalSetting.htm
www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/students/stevenson

This webpage project was designed for a gemstones and gemology course in the 2007 spring semester at Emporia State University. The assignment was to learn webpage creation, as well as present a summary of knowledge gained regarding the meaning and process of pavé stone setting. Examples of pavé stone setting can be seen in the three images below.

Left image taken from www.alexandreschool.com/ENG/002-atelier-02-opticalFoto03.htm.
Right image taken from www.alexandreschool.com/ENG/002-atelier-02-opticalFoto04.htm.

Micropavé taken from www.grstrainingcenter.com/micropave/4.html.


Table of Contents

Introduction to Pavé Stone Setting

The Meaning of Pavé

Where to Study Pavé

References and Recommended Links


Introduction to Pavé Stone Setting

A street or sidewalk is paved when the ground is covered with a paving stone such as bricks of clay or stone. Pavé is a French word meaning to pave and it is used by jewelry designers to describe the process of covering a surface with gemstones, usually diamonds (Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 1987). For the bench jeweler, pavé is more tedious of setting styles to accomplish that requires a great deal of patience and good tool control. For more information see an article found on Google http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pave+stone+setting&btnG=Google+Search and choose Professional Jeweler Archive: Pavé (www.professionaljewelermagazine.com/archives/articles/2002/jul02/0702pb1.html).

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The Meaning of Pavé

Pavé is referred to as the paving stone setting where many small stones are set together in a mass to totally cover the entire design. Stones are also set flush with the surface of metal, emphasizing a mass effect rather than any particular gemstone. The back of the setting may be left open to enhance the brilliance of the stones in the setting.

The images above are good examples of pavé. For example, the ring on the left is made up of approximately 1/2 carat of yellow diamonds, as well as chocolate and yellow diamonds approximately 1.5 mm. This size is about the diameter of the head of a straight pin! The top two pieces represent work from the Optical Setting School, which was started in 1994 by Alexandre Sidorov using the techniques he developed through his experience as an optical engraver and goldsmith. He blended the tools utilized in both professions and conducts the work looking through the microscope. This is what has given rise to the name Optical Setting for this method of pavé stone setting. Other methods taught include grain-pavé, grain-filé, serti-clos, and solitaire for various applications such as jewelry, watches, pens, and the like.

The buying public is returning to a rebirth or that which is old has now become new again. An Art Nouveau style has returned with unique mixtures of gemstones in pavé settings that were reintroduced in the late 1980's (www.gia.edu/newsroom/3720/10014/public_interest_articles_details.cfm).

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Where to Study Pavé

In the United States, there are schools and classes being offered that are gaining interest for this form of stone setting. There are specialized classes being taught at GRS in Emporia, Kansas by highly respected instructors in Basic and Advanced Stone Setting including Todd Daniels, Christian DeCamillis, and Blaine Lewis. For those wishing to achieve a higher level of skill in stone setting, the art of Advanced Micro-Pavé Stone Setting is offered, which is being taught by the internationally recognized artist, Jura. Visit www.grstrainingcenter.com/courses.html and go to Basic Stone Setting.

The third image above is an example of work by Jura, an amazing artisian. The gemstones are 1.5 mm round faceted diamond. For more information and examples of the work created by Jura, information is available at www.diaset.nl/.

The images shown below on the left and right are examples of the advanced stone setting work from the Emporia, Kansas school. For more information on classes at Glendo/GRS, visit www.glendo.com.

Another place to study this particular gem setting technique is in Antwerp, Belgium. The Alexandre School and Atelier (image below, center) teaches a three month course in optical stone setting, which includes pavé using state of the art equipment and facilities along with instructors of high regard to this form of art. This school is under the direction of Alexandre Sidorov, who is internationally known for his excellence as an artist and instructor (www.alexandreschool.com/ENG/02-atelier-02-opticalSetting.htm).

Images taken from
http://www.grstrainingcenter.com/advancedstonesetting/1.html (left)
http://www.alexandreschool.com/ENG/001-school-04-opticalFoto01.htm (center)
http://www.grstrainingcenter.com/advancedstonesetting/2.html (right)

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References

Recommended Links

GO 340 Gemstones
www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/syllabus.htm
GO 340 WebPage Assignment
www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/webpage.htm
Return to GO 340 Past Student WebPages
www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/students/stupages.htm
GO 340 Gemstone Links
www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/gemlinks.htm

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For more information email the author at autumnwinds41@yahoo.com. Webpage created May 13, 2007; lastest update May 28, 2007.