GO 340 Gemstones & Gemology
ES 567 Gemstones of the World
Emporia State University
Dr. Susan Ward Aber, Geologist & Gemologist
Emporia State University
Emporia, Kansas USA

academic.emporia.edu/abersusa/go340/tucson08b.htm

Tucson Gem, Mineral, and Fossil Shows 2008-present

From Kansas to Arizona!
Tucson and Surroundings
The Shows
The Fossils
The Minerals
The Gems

Fossils


Inviting entrance to a fossil
extravaganza! Ammonites and
more. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Ammonites with a play of colors
are from Alberta, Canada. For more
information see www.korite.com.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Coloration in this extinct
ammonite fossil is
exceptional. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

When fashioned into a gem,
the name assigned is ammolite.
This was designated the
official gemstone for Alberta
in 2004. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

These mollusks died near
the end of the Cretaceous,
65 million years ago.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

The iridescence is a result
of a nacreous shell of
alternating layers of
aragonite and conchiolin.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

The play of color layer
is thin, about 0.5-0.8 mm
or 0.02-0.03 inches in
thickness without the
matrix. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

A cracking or frost shattering
is common on the shell and
referred to as dragon skin or
a stained glass window pattern.
Image by S.W. Aber; photo
date 2/08.

Ammonites were predatory
marine mollusks who lived in
the Western Interior Seaway
during the Cretaceous.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Image taken from
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Image:Cretaceous_seaway.png

Ammonites were cephalopods
and share similarities with
modern relatives including squid,
octopus and chambered nautilus.
Image by S.W. Aber; photo
date 2/08.



Turtles! Image
by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.


Sea turtle (Protostega
gigas
) had a sharp beak
and strong jaws. Cretaceous
animals that feed on jellyfish
and shellfish, as well as
seaweed. Protostega was the
second largest turtle that
ever lived. For more information
visit the Black Hills Institute
of Geological Research, Inc. at
www.bhigr.com/pages/info/
info_arch.htm
, and EuroTurtle
at www.euroturtle.org/
biology/fossil.htm
.


Fossils galore!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Yes, visit them at
www.jcfossils.com/.
It is worth the your time!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Fossil fish preserved
in the Eocene Green River
Formation, Lincoln County,
Wyoming. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

They reported finding
Stingrays, Gar, Paddle Fish,
Crayfish, Crocodile Teeth, Bird,
Leaves, and Insects. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

I can imagine them swimming
and enjoying life at one time!
Image by S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Preservation is remarkable and
specimens are uncovered using
hand tools. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

It was fascinating to watch
the fish back to life!
A spectacular palm frond is in
the background. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Yes, you may have seen
them featured in a 2007
Cash and Treasure TV show
from the Travel Channel!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Fossils, fossils, fossils.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Enormous trilobites!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Ammonites, trilobites and
crinoids - of my! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Preserved crinoid specimens!
These animals are also called
sea lilies or feather stars.
They first appeared 530 million
years ago and flourished in the
Paleozoic shallow inland seas.
Image by S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Trilobites are an extinct
class of arthropods that first
appeared 570 million years ago
and flourished in the Paleozoic.
They died out 240 million years
ago, late Permian. Trilobites were
bottom dwellers and their remains
have been found on every continent!
Image by S.W. Aber; photo
date 2/08.

Susie for scale.
Image by J. Archer;
photo date 2/08.

Moroco has Belemnite fossils!
These fossils are Devonian in
age and an extinct member of the
Mollusk group, Orthoceras.
These elongated cephalopods
are stunning in the rock matrix
and crafted into table tops, sinks,
plates, goblets, or sculptures! For
more information, www.paleodirect.com/
strceph1.htm
. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Satin spar gypsum hollowed
for lights. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

More Eocene fishes framed
and ready to display
behind the sofa! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Ammonites were everywhere!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Eocene fish...
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Cave bear for display
and sale! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

In the midst of all the
fossils, a lone quartz
crystal displays a treasure
from the Earth.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Did I menion petrified
wood... furniture?
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Slabs and trunks, petrified
wood makes a stunning display!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Office desk to coffee
table... Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

It makes a comfortable living
room setting! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Petrified wood!
Image S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

...and more petrified wood.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Enjoying nature inside...with
petrified wood. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Sea and land fossils.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Stromatolite display and
Orthoceras wine bottle
holder?! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Dinosaur trackways, Dromaeosaurus
albertensis
, were found in China.
The toe impression shows only two toes;
the killing claw was held off the
ground when walking. This animal was
a carnivore and lived in the
Cretaceous. Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Preserved palm frond
in a limestone! Susie
for scale?! Image by
S. Kelley; photo date 2/08.

Fossils from Kansas!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Preserved early life in the
Biwabik Iron Formation,
Northern Minnesota.
Stromatolite colony
Proterozoic, 2.1 billion
years old. Image by
S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Great preservation in
limestone. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Fossils... Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Fossils... and Uruguayan
amethyst geodes!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Glyptodon was a large,
armored mammal related to
the armadillo but lived
during the Pleistocene.
It could be the sized of a
Volkswagen Beetle car!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

This animal was likely a
herbivore, grazing on grass
and plants, with movement of
only 1-2 miles per hour! What
an awesome tail?! Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Mammoth skeleton and
recreated one with hair.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

This Woolly Mammoth
Reproduction was for sale
at $25,000.00. The card
read...Carcasses have
been found preserved in
frozen ground in Siberia.
They grew the size of Asiatic
elephants of today and
possessed warm coats of
long guard hairs and soft
underwool, with large curved
ivory tusks and knob-like
heads.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Wooly rhino.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

These two images show the
Pleistocene Bison (Bison
priscus
). Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

This steppe bison became
extinct between 11,000 and
8,000 years ago. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

The Musk Ox was for sale
at $30,000. It was from the
Pleistocene era, Siberia.
The animal has been reintroduced
to Russia today. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

Cave Bear skeleton (Ursus
spelaeus
) uncovered in
Russian cave in the Ural
Mountains, 2004, with 79%
bone recovered.
$20,000.00. Image by
S.W. Aber; photo date 2/08.

...and if you appreciate
chess and Pleistocene
creatures you will love
this carved set.
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

Bone, teeth, ivory...
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.

What a game!
Image by S.W. Aber;
photo date 2/08.


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This page originates from the Earth Science department for the use and benefit of students enrolled at Emporia State University. For more information contact the course instructor, S. W. Aber, e-mail: esu.abersusie@gmail.com Thanks for visiting! Webpage created: February 2008; last update: November 19, 2012.

Copyright 2008-2012 Susan Ward Aber. All rights reserved.