Biology of Mexican Vertebrates

The section on Mammalogy was taught by Dwight Moore and Marco Lozano. These are pictures of some of the activities.

photo along the tripThis is Marco explaining how to set a Sherman trap.
Marco explaining how to set a bat net.photo along the trip
photo along the tripThis is a fruit bat that we have caught in our net. The round object to the left is a fig that the bat was carrying when it was caught in the net.
Seth and Amy examining the bat that evening. Generally, the bats are measured, identified, and released.photo along the trip
photo along the tripChance, Amy, and Seth examining a bat that we kept until the next morning. Some individuals are kept and processed as museum specimens for the collection at La Universidad de Morleos.
Matt, Mark, and Ursula watch as Marco gets a bat out of the net.photo along the trip
photo along the tripA couple of students are feeling a bat's wing.
Monica, Marco, and Eleonor are checking to see what they have in their Sherman traps.photo along the trip
photo along the tripA Virginia opossum that we caught in a hav-a-hart. The opossum was sexed, measured, and released.
As each group of students rotates through mammalogy, they are given instructions on setting traps. Here each student will be given 10 Sherman traps and either a hav-a-hart or tomahawk to set.photo along the trip
photo along the tripTheresa checking her traps the next morning.
Dwight demonstrating how to make a museum specimen of a cotton rat.photo along the trip
photo along the tripA photo of on one of the teams as we get ready to set bat nets. Standing are Elena, Andy, Cliff, Jason, Tammy, Marco, Edith, Victor, and Luis. Kneeling are Daphne, Amy, Rodrigo.
Dwight holding an opossum.photo along the trip
photo along the tripMarco demostrating how to make a plaster cast of a track. This is a semi-flooded area at the edge of a mangrove swamp.
Track of a yagaroundi in the mud near the mangrove swamp.photo along the trip

Last updated on 18 September 2004.
Provide comments to Dwight Moore at mooredwi@emporia.edu.
Return to the Biology of Mexican Vertebrtaes web page at Emporia State University